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Program content for Science

In your first year, you will take foundation courses in science disciplines and gradually build essential knowledge & skills. During your second year, you will strengthen your skills and continue to integrate knowledge. In your last semester, you will have the option to select science courses that best suit your academic interests and future goals.

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 340-101-MQ
    Philosophy and Rationality
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course studies the use of language and thought in relation to reasoning and argumentation. It also explores the birth of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece, the transition from mythology to philosophy and from philosophy of nature to ethics and metaphysics. Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, are among the philosophers covered in different sections of this course. 
     

  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 101-NYA-05
    General Biology I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    The main objective of General Biology I is to view life forms as the result of the evolutionary process. By recognizing and characterizing life forms with respect to their structure, genetic features and mutual interactions with the environment, students are invited to develop an understanding of the physical, chemical and biological elements that affect life. Case studies and laboratory exercises are designed to complement the theory component of the course. Activities include field sampling, cellular microscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, antibiotic sensitivity testing and data analysis software.

  • 201-NYA-05
    Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a standard first course in Differential Calculus. It introduces the concept of limits for sequences and functions and, in particular, studies the derivative and its applications in analyzing functions and in solving related rate and optimization problems.

  • 202-NYA-05
    General Chemistry
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Chemistry or equivalent)

    General chemistry introduces students to the principal concepts underlying the structures of atoms and molecules and relates atomic structure to the periodicity in the properties of the elements. The characteristics of the chemical bonds which hold the atoms in the molecules and descriptive chemistry are discussed in this laboratory-oriented course.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 340-102-MQ
    Concepts of Humanity
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    (Prerequisite: 340-101-MQ)
    A survey of the history of philosophy as it pertains to how humanity has come to understand itself morally, metaphysically, psychologically, spiritually, and epistemologically. Topics discussed may include (but are not restricted to) nominalism, humanism, attitudes towards the Ancients and towards the future, empiricism, rationalism, modernity, existentialism, and/or post-modernity.
     

  • 603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-NYC-05
    Linear Algebra
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    Matrices and determinants are introduced to solve systems of linear equations. Vectors in Euclidean space, scalar products and vector products are used to study geometry in two and three dimensions. Optional topics and applications include linear programming and eigenvectors.

  • 202-NYB-05
    Chemistry of Solutions
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Chemistry or equivalent)

    This course provides an introduction to the behaviour of ionic and molecular substances in solution, to equilibrium principles and to acid-base concepts. Electro-chemical principles and the major concepts governing why and how chemical reactions occur in solutions are discussed in this laboratory-oriented course.

     

  • 203-NYA-05
    Mechanics
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Physics  or equivalent   Co-requisite 201-NYA-05)

    Mechanics provides science students with a thorough understanding of classical non-relativistic mechanics. Topics studied in this course include the kinematics and dynamics of translation and rotation, conservation of energy, linear momentum, angular momentum and gravitation. Vector algebra and differential calculus are introduced as tools to understand these topics.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 603-103-M
    Literary Themes
    603-103-M
    Literary Themes
  • 340-CXA-HR
    Science and Moral Issues (for Science students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course covers topics pertaining to the overlap between ethics and the theory and practice of the exact sciences. Such topics may include (but are not exhausted by): the ethics of scientific collaboration in industry and the military; the ethics of using animals in medical testing; environmental ethics; professional responsibility and integrity in scientific publication; the treatment of non-scientific areas of study by scientists; public perceptions (and misperceptions) of scientific results and methods; etc. 
     

  • 603-888-02
    English Exit Exam

    In order to receive their diplomas, graduating students must have passed the English Exit Exam, which evaluates college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking. 
    To be eligible to write the English Exit Exam, students must have passed two of the following English courses AND be in the process of completing a third:

    603-101-MQ
    603-102-MQ
    603-103-MQ
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-NYB-05
    Calculus II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 201-103-RE or 201-NYA-05)

    This course continues the study of limits with the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It covers techniques of integration, improper integrals, and application to areas, volumes, and arc length. Approximation techniques using differentials and Taylor and Maclaurin series are also introduced together with differential equations.

  • 203-NYB-05
    Electricity and Magnetism
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 203-NYA-05;                  

    Co-requisite: 201-203-77/201-NYB-05)

    Electricity and magnetism introduces science students to the basic concepts of classical electricity and magnetism. Topics studied include the following: Coulomb's law, electric fields, Gauss's law, electric potential, capacitance, Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's rules, magnetic fields, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and LRC RLC circuits. Both differential and integral calculus are used.

  • 202-CWC-05
    Organic Chemistry I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 202-NYA-05 or 202-NYB-05)

    Students are introduced to the fundamentals of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Basic concepts of reaction mechanisms and three-dimensional structures of organic compounds are discussed as are spectroscopic techniques. The chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives are used to illustrate these concepts in this laboratory-oriented course.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 603-CXE-HR
    Arts and Science Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Science or Arts. The literature texts studied focus on subjects pertaining to these two fields, including: the portrayals of scientists and artists, the search for truth, the roles of the artist and the scientist, and the concerns of science fiction. The course also introduces students to the basic assumptions and theories of literary criticism (new criticism, reader-response, deconstructive, biographical, historical, new historical, psychological, feminist) as they pertain to the three core disciplines. Students learn to apply theory in the analysis of texts and in their own writing. Each student also engages in an oral presentation that deals with issues pertaining to science, liberal arts, and visual arts. 

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 203-NYC-05
    Waves, Optics and Modern Physics
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisites: 203-NYA-05, 201-NYA-05)

    Waves, Optics and Modern Physics introduces science students to the study of oscillatory motion, geometric and wave optics as well as selected aspects of modern physics. Topics studied in this course include reflection, refraction, superposition, interference, diffraction and an introduction to selected topics in modern physics. Vector algebra and differential calculus are used throughout the course.

  • 990-200-B0
    Program Exit Assessment

Choose Two of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 101-CWB-05
    General Biology II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    General Biology II studies multicellular life forms, focusing on the relationships between plants and animals. It investigates the balance between energy-acquiring processes of plants and the energy-releasing activities of animals, examines the strategies that both plants and animals use to survive in different environments, and explores how these organisms meet the demands of life in order to reproduce. The course surveys organ systems, using case studies and laboratory exercises to complement the theory component of the course. Students are invited to practice their techniques in microscopy and experimentation using specialized equipment and data analysis software.

  • 201-CWE-05
    Calculus III
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 201-NYB-05; Recommended Co-requisite: 201-NYC-05)

    Calculus III is designed for students who are interested in further studies in calculus. The differentiation and integration of functions in several variables lead to the concepts of partial derivatives and multiple integrals. This involves curves, surfaces and volumes in space. Convergence of various types of series and the appropriate tests to use are studied.

  • 202-CWD-05
    Organic Chemistry II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 202-CWC-05)

    This is a continuation of the course 202-CWC-05. A systematic approach using the basic concepts of a few types of reactions is used to present the chemistry of several classes of organic compounds including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, ethers, amines, amino acids, heterocyclic compounds and proteins in this laboratory-oriented course.

Program content for Science with Pre-Calculus

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 340-101-MQ
    Philosophy and Rationality
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course studies the use of language and thought in relation to reasoning and argumentation. It also explores the birth of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece, the transition from mythology to philosophy and from philosophy of nature to ethics and metaphysics. Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, are among the philosophers covered in different sections of this course. 
     

  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 101-NYA-05
    General Biology I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    The main objective of General Biology I is to view life forms as the result of the evolutionary process. By recognizing and characterizing life forms with respect to their structure, genetic features and mutual interactions with the environment, students are invited to develop an understanding of the physical, chemical and biological elements that affect life. Case studies and laboratory exercises are designed to complement the theory component of the course. Activities include field sampling, cellular microscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, antibiotic sensitivity testing and data analysis software.

  • 201-CWF-05
    Pre-Calculus (Introduction to College Math)
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    The emphasis in this course is given to the concept of a function and its graph. The functions studied include: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and their inverses. Algebra skills required in calculus are covered and vectors are introduced.

  • 202-NYA-05
    General Chemistry
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Chemistry or equivalent)

    General chemistry introduces students to the principal concepts underlying the structures of atoms and molecules and relates atomic structure to the periodicity in the properties of the elements. The characteristics of the chemical bonds which hold the atoms in the molecules and descriptive chemistry are discussed in this laboratory-oriented course.

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 340-102-MQ
    Concepts of Humanity
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    (Prerequisite: 340-101-MQ)
    A survey of the history of philosophy as it pertains to how humanity has come to understand itself morally, metaphysically, psychologically, spiritually, and epistemologically. Topics discussed may include (but are not restricted to) nominalism, humanism, attitudes towards the Ancients and towards the future, empiricism, rationalism, modernity, existentialism, and/or post-modernity.
     

  • 603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
  • 602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-NYA-05
    Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a standard first course in Differential Calculus. It introduces the concept of limits for sequences and functions and, in particular, studies the derivative and its applications in analyzing functions and in solving related rate and optimization problems.

  • 203-NYA-05
    Mechanics
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Physics  or equivalent   Co-requisite 201-NYA-05)

    Mechanics provides science students with a thorough understanding of classical non-relativistic mechanics. Topics studied in this course include the kinematics and dynamics of translation and rotation, conservation of energy, linear momentum, angular momentum and gravitation. Vector algebra and differential calculus are introduced as tools to understand these topics.

  • 202-NYB-05
    Chemistry of Solutions
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Chemistry or equivalent)

    This course provides an introduction to the behaviour of ionic and molecular substances in solution, to equilibrium principles and to acid-base concepts. Electro-chemical principles and the major concepts governing why and how chemical reactions occur in solutions are discussed in this laboratory-oriented course.

     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 603-330-HR
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    603-330-HR
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
  • 340-CXA-HR
    Science and Moral Issues (for Science students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course covers topics pertaining to the overlap between ethics and the theory and practice of the exact sciences. Such topics may include (but are not exhausted by): the ethics of scientific collaboration in industry and the military; the ethics of using animals in medical testing; environmental ethics; professional responsibility and integrity in scientific publication; the treatment of non-scientific areas of study by scientists; public perceptions (and misperceptions) of scientific results and methods; etc. 
     

  • 603-888-02
    English Exit Exam

    In order to receive their diplomas, graduating students must have passed the English Exit Exam, which evaluates college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking. 
    To be eligible to write the English Exit Exam, students must have passed two of the following English courses AND be in the process of completing a third:

    603-101-MQ
    603-102-MQ
    603-103-MQ
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-NYB-05
    Calculus II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 201-103-RE or 201-NYA-05)

    This course continues the study of limits with the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It covers techniques of integration, improper integrals, and application to areas, volumes, and arc length. Approximation techniques using differentials and Taylor and Maclaurin series are also introduced together with differential equations.

  • 203-NYB-05
    Electricity and Magnetism
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 203-NYA-05;                  

    Co-requisite: 201-203-77/201-NYB-05)

    Electricity and magnetism introduces science students to the basic concepts of classical electricity and magnetism. Topics studied include the following: Coulomb's law, electric fields, Gauss's law, electric potential, capacitance, Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's rules, magnetic fields, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and LRC RLC circuits. Both differential and integral calculus are used.

  • 202-CWC-05
    Organic Chemistry I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 202-NYA-05 or 202-NYB-05)

    Students are introduced to the fundamentals of the chemistry of carbon compounds. Basic concepts of reaction mechanisms and three-dimensional structures of organic compounds are discussed as are spectroscopic techniques. The chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives are used to illustrate these concepts in this laboratory-oriented course.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    1
    2
  • 603-CXE-HR
    Arts and Science Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Science or Arts. The literature texts studied focus on subjects pertaining to these two fields, including: the portrayals of scientists and artists, the search for truth, the roles of the artist and the scientist, and the concerns of science fiction. The course also introduces students to the basic assumptions and theories of literary criticism (new criticism, reader-response, deconstructive, biographical, historical, new historical, psychological, feminist) as they pertain to the three core disciplines. Students learn to apply theory in the analysis of texts and in their own writing. Each student also engages in an oral presentation that deals with issues pertaining to science, liberal arts, and visual arts. 

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 990-200-B0
    Program Exit Assessment

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-NYC-05
    Linear Algebra
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    Matrices and determinants are introduced to solve systems of linear equations. Vectors in Euclidean space, scalar products and vector products are used to study geometry in two and three dimensions. Optional topics and applications include linear programming and eigenvectors.

  • 203-NYC-05
    Waves, Optics and Modern Physics
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisites: 203-NYA-05, 201-NYA-05)

    Waves, Optics and Modern Physics introduces science students to the study of oscillatory motion, geometric and wave optics as well as selected aspects of modern physics. Topics studied in this course include reflection, refraction, superposition, interference, diffraction and an introduction to selected topics in modern physics. Vector algebra and differential calculus are used throughout the course.

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 101-CWB-05
    General Biology II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    General Biology II studies multicellular life forms, focusing on the relationships between plants and animals. It investigates the balance between energy-acquiring processes of plants and the energy-releasing activities of animals, examines the strategies that both plants and animals use to survive in different environments, and explores how these organisms meet the demands of life in order to reproduce. The course surveys organ systems, using case studies and laboratory exercises to complement the theory component of the course. Students are invited to practice their techniques in microscopy and experimentation using specialized equipment and data analysis software.

  • 201-CWE-05
    Calculus III
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 201-NYB-05; Recommended Co-requisite: 201-NYC-05)

    Calculus III is designed for students who are interested in further studies in calculus. The differentiation and integration of functions in several variables lead to the concepts of partial derivatives and multiple integrals. This involves curves, surfaces and volumes in space. Convergence of various types of series and the appropriate tests to use are studied.

  • 202-CWD-05
    Organic Chemistry II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 202-CWC-05)

    This is a continuation of the course 202-CWC-05. A systematic approach using the basic concepts of a few types of reactions is used to present the chemistry of several classes of organic compounds including aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, ethers, amines, amino acids, heterocyclic compounds and proteins in this laboratory-oriented course.

Learning spaces and resources

The Science Program has dedicated biology, chemistry, and physics labs. We also have math lab activities that take place in modern computer labs.

Science students can get extra help from peer mentors and science teachers are available several hours per week in The Brigil Learning Centre

Admission requirements

Admission requirements for the Accounting and Management Technology program vary depending on if you are a Quebec-resident, out-of-province applicant, or international applicant. Please review all general and program-specfic requirements before applying. 

Interested?

We'd love to show you everything Cégep Heritage College has to offer. If you'd like to know more about this program, you can: