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Program content

Graduates of the Liberal Arts program at Cégep Heritage College are well prepared to flourish in university programs, and to pursue careers in academia, journalism, law, education, policy analysis, and many more. When beginning the program, students will take introductory courses in English, Philosophy, History, Health and Physical Activity, and Research Methods.

As students continue in the program, they will study more specific topics, such as Epic Poetry, Modern Philosophy, Ethics and Human Rights. Throughout, students choose from elective courses offered such as History of Art, Film, Drama, General Psychology. and more.

Finally, students produce a substantial Integrative Project in their 4th semester, applying ideas from across the Liberal Arts curriculum to a topic of the students’ choice.

Liberal Arts with math

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

  • 345-101-MQ
    Knowledge
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course’s emphasis is on how knowledge is defined, acquired, transmitted and applied. Students examine both messages and media to identify the strengths and limitations of each. Students learn to situate knowledge in a social, historical and personal context, a skill they will need in order to become lifelong learners. 

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 300-303-RE
    Methodology
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    (For Liberal Arts students)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and methods of research and writing in the overall academic area of the Liberal Arts. Students will acquire the skills they need to undertake research and to master the technologies associated with pursuing academic studies in today’s library. 
     

  • 332-115-RE
    Ancient World
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course aims to introduce the student to the historical study of antiquity through a survey of ancient civilization, beginning with Mesopotamia and Egypt, and carrying on through the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. In so doing, the student will be made aware of the character, originality, achievements, and lasting accomplishments of these ancient cultures, and how each in turn has left its imprint on our world today. 
     

  • 370-333-RE
    Religion: Judaism, Christianity and Islam
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the faith and teachings of the three related monotheistic religions which originated in the ancient Mid-East, namely, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. 
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 520-A10-HR
    History of Art I
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    Students begin to learn the vocabulary associated with analyzing painting, sculpture and architecture. They will make appropriate connections between the artwork and its socio-historical context.  They will observe and study specific movements in the history of art beginning with the notion of artworks from “prehistory” to the 15th century.
     

  • 607-A01-HR
    College Spanish I
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This is an introductory course in the Spanish language which covers the basic requirements to understand and communicate with Hispanics. Oral comprehension and oral expression are emphasized throughout this course. Students who are fluent in the Spanish language will not be permitted to enroll in this course. 
     

  • 530-A01-HR
    Language and Analysis of Film
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How do films communicate; what do films communicate? This course is a study of the language of film: its conventions, mechanisms, grammar, development and effect. 
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 345-102-MQ
    World Views
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The course focuses on how individuals, groups, societies or nations organize ideas, perceptions and values into explanatory patterns. Students explore major ideas and value systems by which diverse individuals, groups, societies or nations seek to explain the world and their place in it. 
     

  • 602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-223-HR
    English Classics I
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 17th century, this course enables students to: distinguish genres of literary discourse, recognize literary conventions within a specific genre, situate a discourse within its historical and literary period and explicate a discourse representative of a literary genre. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 340-910-RE
    Ancient Philosophy (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course studies ancient Greek philosophy and the cultural world in which it arose. A major text of the period will be read and discussed. Students learn how to identify, analyze and criticize philosophical ideas.
     

  • 201-103-RE
    Differential and Integral Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a course in Differential Calculus designed for students in Social Science, Commerce, and Liberal Arts. The course starts by reviewing the properties of different functions and their graphs. The derivative is used to solve optimization and related rates problems from Business, Economics, and the Social Sciences.

  • 603-H06-HR
    Epic Poetry
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces Liberal Arts students to the most significant Greek and Roman classical texts, including works by Homer, Virgil and Ovid. The major themes and conventions of these works are examined in light of their significance in shaping western culture and thought.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 603-322-HR
    English Classics II
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the 18th century to the present, this course enables students to: recognize the treatment of a theme within a literary discourse, situate a literary discourse within its cultural context and explicate a discourse from a thematic perspective. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 360-125-RE
    Science: History and Methodology
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    This course aims to convey to students a critical understanding and appreciation of the historical development and important ideas of medieval and modern Science and their methods, proceedings and discoveries. 
     

  • 330-101-RE
    Post-Classical History
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces students to the historical development and mutual influences of European and neighbouring civilizations from the period following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire to the twentieth century. Selected time periods and regions are examined to illustrate the continuity of ideas and institutions. 
     

  • 520-903-RE
    Thematic Studies in the History of Art
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    Students will explore selected themes as they appear throughout the history of art, examining artwork and making connections between various cultures and time periods. 

  • 340-912-RE
    Modern Philosophy (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The course introduces students to modern Western philosophy (15th to 20th century) as expressed in the writings of some of its major philosophers (e.g. Descartes and Hume). Topics covered may include epistemology (e.g. rationalism, empiricism, transcendentalism), metaphysics (e.g. human nature, God, mind/body problem, personal identity, meaning of life), and value theory (e.g. morality, politics). Some contemporary versions of philosophical issues stemming from modern philosophy (e.g. nature of consciousness, free will) may also be explored.

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-105-RE
    Linear Algebra
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    Matrices and determinants are introduced to solve systems of linear equations. Vectors in Euclidean space, scalar products and vector products are used to study geometry in two and three dimensions. Optional topics and applications include Markov chains, Leontief Economic models and linear programming.

  • 510-H01-HR
    Drawing
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    Students learn the basics of drawing. No special skills are required as this is a “hands-on” course. This introduction acquaints students not only with the technical aspects of the medium but more importantly, the artistic process. The course begins slowly in a carefully supervised studio setting. This is a course for all where students gain an awareness and appreciation of the discipline.

  • 603-H04-HR
    Theatre Workshop
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course exposes Liberal Arts students to a wide range of drama, both traditional and modern. Students, as well, participate in workshops and other activities designed to lead to an appreciation of the dramatist’s and the actor’s craft. 
     

  • 350-102-RE
    Introduction to Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation course consists of an empirically and theoretically based study of human behaviour and mental processes. As a general introduction to psychology, major topics include learning, memory, perception, consciousness, thought and language, and the biological dimensions of being human. This course introduces students to writing formal research papers in Psychology.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-CXE-HR
    Arts and Science Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Science or Arts. The literature texts studied focus on subjects pertaining to these two fields, including: the portrayals of scientists and artists, the search for truth, the roles of the artist and the scientist, and the concerns of science fiction. The course also introduces students to the basic assumptions and theories of literary criticism (new criticism, reader-response, deconstructive, biographical, historical, new historical, psychological, feminist) as they pertain to the three core disciplines. Students learn to apply theory in the analysis of texts and in their own writing. Each student also engages in an oral presentation that deals with issues pertaining to science, liberal arts, and visual arts. 

  • 345-CXD-HR
    Ethics and Human Rights (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course explores the philosophical and historical foundations of the concept of human rights. It examines the seminal philosophical literature on the subject and the history of the most important codes and charters of rights.
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 360-126-RE
    Integrative Course
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    (Recommended Prerequisite: 300-302-94)
    This course is offered in the final semester of the Liberal Arts program and draws together the professors and students in an interactive learning project. Students are required to produce a work of original research which integrates at least three disciplines which they have studied within the program. This is meant to show the underlying unity of the human condition and to help students identify and clarify the perspectives of the different disciplines. Finally, the course provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their learning before proceeding to university. 
     

  • 360-124-RE
    Principles of Math and Logic
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    The purpose of this course is to demonstrate the nature of formal reasoning. To that end, this course will introduce the students to: some of the central concepts of mathematics and logic such as validity, soundness, proof, axiom, postulate, theorem, consistency etc ; both deductive and inductive systems; the principles of postulational thinking and their importance to much of ordinary mathematics. 
     

  • 201-203-RE
    Differential and Integral Calculus II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

     

    (Prerequisite: 201-103-RE or 201-NYA-05)

    This course continues the study of limits with the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It covers techniques of integration, improper integrals, and application to areas, economics, and finance. Approximation techniques using differentials and Taylor and Maclaurin series are also introduced together with differential equations.

  • 990-700-02
    Program Exit Assessment

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 510-H02-HR
    Sculpture
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    Students without any formal skills or prior experience in art can explore various media in a carefully supervised studio setting. They learn to create objects in three dimensions. This course is designed to acquaint the non-art student with the basic methods of three-dimensional composition, modelling, carving and construction. 

  • 530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

Liberal Arts without math

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

  • 345-101-MQ
    Knowledge
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course’s emphasis is on how knowledge is defined, acquired, transmitted and applied. Students examine both messages and media to identify the strengths and limitations of each. Students learn to situate knowledge in a social, historical and personal context, a skill they will need in order to become lifelong learners. 

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 300-303-RE
    Methodology
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    (For Liberal Arts students)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and methods of research and writing in the overall academic area of the Liberal Arts. Students will acquire the skills they need to undertake research and to master the technologies associated with pursuing academic studies in today’s library. 
     

  • 332-115-RE
    Ancient World
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course aims to introduce the student to the historical study of antiquity through a survey of ancient civilization, beginning with Mesopotamia and Egypt, and carrying on through the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. In so doing, the student will be made aware of the character, originality, achievements, and lasting accomplishments of these ancient cultures, and how each in turn has left its imprint on our world today. 
     

  • 370-333-RE
    Religion: Judaism, Christianity and Islam
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The objective of this course is to introduce students to the faith and teachings of the three related monotheistic religions which originated in the ancient Mid-East, namely, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. 
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 520-A10-HR
    History of Art I
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    Students begin to learn the vocabulary associated with analyzing painting, sculpture and architecture. They will make appropriate connections between the artwork and its socio-historical context.  They will observe and study specific movements in the history of art beginning with the notion of artworks from “prehistory” to the 15th century.
     

  • 607-A01-HR
    College Spanish I
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This is an introductory course in the Spanish language which covers the basic requirements to understand and communicate with Hispanics. Oral comprehension and oral expression are emphasized throughout this course. Students who are fluent in the Spanish language will not be permitted to enroll in this course. 
     

  • 530-A01-HR
    Language and Analysis of Film
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How do films communicate; what do films communicate? This course is a study of the language of film: its conventions, mechanisms, grammar, development and effect. 
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 345-102-MQ
    World Views
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The course focuses on how individuals, groups, societies or nations organize ideas, perceptions and values into explanatory patterns. Students explore major ideas and value systems by which diverse individuals, groups, societies or nations seek to explain the world and their place in it. 
     

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-223-HR
    English Classics I
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 17th century, this course enables students to: distinguish genres of literary discourse, recognize literary conventions within a specific genre, situate a discourse within its historical and literary period and explicate a discourse representative of a literary genre. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 340-910-RE
    Ancient Philosophy (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course studies ancient Greek philosophy and the cultural world in which it arose. A major text of the period will be read and discussed. Students learn how to identify, analyze and criticize philosophical ideas.
     

  • 603-H06-HR
    Epic Poetry
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces Liberal Arts students to the most significant Greek and Roman classical texts, including works by Homer, Virgil and Ovid. The major themes and conventions of these works are examined in light of their significance in shaping western culture and thought.
     

Choose Two of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 520-A20-HR
    History of Art II
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    Students learn the vocabulary associated with analyzing painting, sculpture and architecture. They will make appropriate connections between the artwork and its socio-historical context.  They will observe and study specific movements in the history of art from the 15th century to modernity.
     

  • 530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3
  • 607-A02-HR
    College Spanish II
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course is offered to students who have acquired the basic skills of communication in Spanish (Level I) and who wish to further develop their proficiency. Students will develop both their oral and written skills in Spanish. 
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 603-322-HR
    English Classics II
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the 18th century to the present, this course enables students to: recognize the treatment of a theme within a literary discourse, situate a literary discourse within its cultural context and explicate a discourse from a thematic perspective. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 330-101-RE
    Post-Classical History
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces students to the historical development and mutual influences of European and neighbouring civilizations from the period following the collapse of the Western Roman Empire to the twentieth century. Selected time periods and regions are examined to illustrate the continuity of ideas and institutions. 
     

  • 520-903-RE
    Thematic Studies in the History of Art
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    Students will explore selected themes as they appear throughout the history of art, examining artwork and making connections between various cultures and time periods. 

  • 360-125-RE
    Science: History and Methodology
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    This course aims to convey to students a critical understanding and appreciation of the historical development and important ideas of medieval and modern Science and their methods, proceedings and discoveries. 
     

  • 340-912-RE
    Modern Philosophy (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The course introduces students to modern Western philosophy (15th to 20th century) as expressed in the writings of some of its major philosophers (e.g. Descartes and Hume). Topics covered may include epistemology (e.g. rationalism, empiricism, transcendentalism), metaphysics (e.g. human nature, God, mind/body problem, personal identity, meaning of life), and value theory (e.g. morality, politics). Some contemporary versions of philosophical issues stemming from modern philosophy (e.g. nature of consciousness, free will) may also be explored.

Choose Two of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 510-H01-HR
    Drawing
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    Students learn the basics of drawing. No special skills are required as this is a “hands-on” course. This introduction acquaints students not only with the technical aspects of the medium but more importantly, the artistic process. The course begins slowly in a carefully supervised studio setting. This is a course for all where students gain an awareness and appreciation of the discipline.

  • 530-A01-HR
    Language and Analysis of Film
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How do films communicate; what do films communicate? This course is a study of the language of film: its conventions, mechanisms, grammar, development and effect. 
     

  • 603-H04-HR
    Theatre Workshop
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course exposes Liberal Arts students to a wide range of drama, both traditional and modern. Students, as well, participate in workshops and other activities designed to lead to an appreciation of the dramatist’s and the actor’s craft. 
     

  • 350-102-RE
    Introduction to Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation course consists of an empirically and theoretically based study of human behaviour and mental processes. As a general introduction to psychology, major topics include learning, memory, perception, consciousness, thought and language, and the biological dimensions of being human. This course introduces students to writing formal research papers in Psychology.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-CXE-HR
    Arts and Science Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Science or Arts. The literature texts studied focus on subjects pertaining to these two fields, including: the portrayals of scientists and artists, the search for truth, the roles of the artist and the scientist, and the concerns of science fiction. The course also introduces students to the basic assumptions and theories of literary criticism (new criticism, reader-response, deconstructive, biographical, historical, new historical, psychological, feminist) as they pertain to the three core disciplines. Students learn to apply theory in the analysis of texts and in their own writing. Each student also engages in an oral presentation that deals with issues pertaining to science, liberal arts, and visual arts. 

  • 345-CXD-HR
    Ethics and Human Rights (for Liberal Arts students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course explores the philosophical and historical foundations of the concept of human rights. It examines the seminal philosophical literature on the subject and the history of the most important codes and charters of rights.
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 360-124-RE
    Principles of Math and Logic
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    The purpose of this course is to demonstrate the nature of formal reasoning. To that end, this course will introduce the students to: some of the central concepts of mathematics and logic such as validity, soundness, proof, axiom, postulate, theorem, consistency etc ; both deductive and inductive systems; the principles of postulational thinking and their importance to much of ordinary mathematics. 
     

  • 360-126-RE
    Integrative Course
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    (Recommended Prerequisite: 300-302-94)
    This course is offered in the final semester of the Liberal Arts program and draws together the professors and students in an interactive learning project. Students are required to produce a work of original research which integrates at least three disciplines which they have studied within the program. This is meant to show the underlying unity of the human condition and to help students identify and clarify the perspectives of the different disciplines. Finally, the course provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their learning before proceeding to university. 
     

  • 990-700-02
    Program Exit Assessment

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 510-H02-HR
    Sculpture
    2
    1-2-3
    2
    1-2-3

    Students without any formal skills or prior experience in art can explore various media in a carefully supervised studio setting. They learn to create objects in three dimensions. This course is designed to acquaint the non-art student with the basic methods of three-dimensional composition, modelling, carving and construction. 

  • 530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    530-XXX-HR
    Cinema Option
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    603-XXX-HR
    English Option
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

Additional graduation and program requirements

English exit exam

In order to graduate, you must pass a Ministerial Examination of College English exam.

Program exit assessment

The Program Exit Assessment (PEA) is a final evaluation activity that shows a student’s achievement throughout the program. It requires students to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills gained from their Diploma of College Studies (DEC), as indicated in our College’s policy on student evaluation.

The PEA serves as a summary of the your experience in the program, including reflection on both program-specific and general-education courses.

Admission requirements

Admission requirements for the Liberal Arts program vary depending on if you are a Quebec-resident, out-of-province applicant, or international applicant. Please review all general and program-specfic requirements before applying. 

Interested?

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