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One program, three profiles

The Social Science program has three different course profiles because you can pursue your education through three different paths:

Program content for Social Science - General Profile

In the first semester of your program, you will take a variety of social science courses that will introduce you to the basic theories and concepts of the disciplines in the program. In the second and third semester, you will continue to build on your basic knowledge by applying it to a personalized research project, as well as build on your learning from the first semester. In the fourth semester of the program, you will complete your studies with an in-depth look at how the disciplines in the social sciences can be applied to real world issues. You will get the opportunity to integrate your knowledge from different disciplines to help understand the causes and the consequences of any societal issue that you choose to analyze.

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    1
    2
  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-102-RE
    Introduction to Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation course consists of an empirically and theoretically based study of human behaviour and mental processes. As a general introduction to psychology, major topics include learning, memory, perception, consciousness, thought and language, and the biological dimensions of being human. This course introduces students to writing formal research papers in Psychology.
     

  • 360-300-RE
    Methods I (only for Social Science Program)
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    Methods I is an initiation course that teaches students the scientific method and its application within the Social Sciences. Students learn to apply and to interpret statistical procedures; to differentiate the various sampling methods and to explain their respective uses; to interpret bivariate frequency distributions; to distinguish between causation and correlation; and, to become critical consumers of statistical information in the social world. The Methods I course is designed to introduce students to the prescribed stages of Social Science research. This course provides students with the tools necessary to shift from anecdotal explanations of the social world to the scientific analysis. Students learn to use SPSS, a statistical software package used extensively in Social Science Research, required in the Social Sciences. 
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 330-910-RE
    Western Civilization
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (This course is a required course for Social Science program.)
    Social Science students in this initiation course examine the major forces that have shaped the culture and institutions of western civilization. Course material seeks to show how its institutions and ideologies have evolved over time using the achievements of individuals and cultures. The relevance of past issues to contemporary life is also discussed. 
     

  • 387-101-HR
    Introduction to Sociology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How are our personal experiences and choices shaped by the society we live in?  And how much power do we have to change the status quo?  This course introduces students to sociological theories and research showing how society shapes us and how we, in turn, shape society.   Topics vary to keep the course relevant to current issues, and may include: sexualities, racial inequality, gender issues, poverty, and other aspects of our changing society.  
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 381-101-HR
    Cultural Anthropology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    The major objective of this initiation course is to introduce the basic concepts of cultural anthropology in order to understand and appreciate cultural diversity in a globalized world. Topics include: strategies of adaptation, political organization, religion and ritual, marriage and kinship, health, language, and migration.
     

  • 385-102-HR
    Introduction to Political Science
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation level course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories and methodologies of Political Science.  From a Canadian comparative perspective, it identifies and develops an understanding of the foundations of political life by focusing on institutions, structures of governance, and civic participation in a democracy, and it seeks to apply this understanding to contemporary issues facing Canadians.  Topics include sovereignty and constitutionalism, federalism and regionalism, the party system, and multiculturalism.  Specific attention will be paid to the role of Quebec within the national political framework.  For students seeking to continue in the discipline of Political Science, this course provides a base for a more advanced understanding of the human phenomenon from a political perspective. 
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 340-101-MQ
    Philosophy and Rationality
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course studies the use of language and thought in relation to reasoning and argumentation. It also explores the birth of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece, the transition from mythology to philosophy and from philosophy of nature to ethics and metaphysics. Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, are among the philosophers covered in different sections of this course. 
     

  • 603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Throughout this course, we will study literature as a way of exploring the varied connections between sport and human nature.  Readings for the course will consist of novels, poems, and stories (fictional or not) that present central themes surrounding athletic competition.  We will discuss sport as a metaphor for life and cover topics including the following:  obsessive fandom, tribalism, the heroic glory of achievement, and the fear of failure.  We will examine the ways in which sport highlights the best and the worst of human behavior.

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-203-HR
    Abnormal Psychology (Prerequisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    In this analysis course, mental health and corresponding disorders are examined. Course material explores the symptoms, courses, treatments and the prevention of psychological disorders. Topics include historical perspectives of abnormal behaviour, the concepts of normalcy and abnormality, personality disorders, anxiety and mood disorders. The implications of mental health are also addressed. Students will continue to develop their skills in writing formal research papers in psychology.
     

  • 300-A01-HR
    Methods II
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 360-300-RE, only for Social Science program)
    The Methods II course follows the Methods I course enabling students to further their understanding and application of the scientific method in Social Science research. In this team-taught course, students learn both qualitative and quantitative approaches to Social Science research. In addition to in-class lab assignments and regular testing, students must conduct original research and submit a scholarly report on this research. Students gain valuable experience in conducting library research, distinguishing between peer-reviewed research and other publications, conducting a literature review, and writing abstracts, among other steps involved in the research process.
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 330-910-RE
    Western Civilization
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (This course is a required course for Social Science program.)
    Social Science students in this initiation course examine the major forces that have shaped the culture and institutions of western civilization. Course material seeks to show how its institutions and ideologies have evolved over time using the achievements of individuals and cultures. The relevance of past issues to contemporary life is also discussed. 
     

  • 387-101-HR
    Introduction to Sociology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How are our personal experiences and choices shaped by the society we live in?  And how much power do we have to change the status quo?  This course introduces students to sociological theories and research showing how society shapes us and how we, in turn, shape society.   Topics vary to keep the course relevant to current issues, and may include: sexualities, racial inequality, gender issues, poverty, and other aspects of our changing society.  
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 381-101-HR
    Cultural Anthropology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    The major objective of this initiation course is to introduce the basic concepts of cultural anthropology in order to understand and appreciate cultural diversity in a globalized world. Topics include: strategies of adaptation, political organization, religion and ritual, marriage and kinship, health, language, and migration.
     

  • 385-102-HR
    Introduction to Political Science
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation level course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories and methodologies of Political Science.  From a Canadian comparative perspective, it identifies and develops an understanding of the foundations of political life by focusing on institutions, structures of governance, and civic participation in a democracy, and it seeks to apply this understanding to contemporary issues facing Canadians.  Topics include sovereignty and constitutionalism, federalism and regionalism, the party system, and multiculturalism.  Specific attention will be paid to the role of Quebec within the national political framework.  For students seeking to continue in the discipline of Political Science, this course provides a base for a more advanced understanding of the human phenomenon from a political perspective. 
     

  • 320-102-HR
    Environmental Geography
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    Humans and their societies shape the world around them in profound ways, resulting in significant challenges to long-term environmental sustainability.  This course introduces students to geographical theories and research that help make sense of contemporary environmental challenges such as climate change, population growth, and the hunger-obesity paradox.  Students examine various environmental issues and assess strategies for adapting to and resolving environmental challenges at the local and global levels.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 603-103-MQ / 603-330-HR
    The Literary Animal
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    The presence of non-human creatures in our daily lives has always challenged our most-cherished notions of human uniqueness and complicated our attitudes towards the world we share with these creatures.  This course studies some of the ways in which writers have tried to address the contradictions implicit in a human worldview that sets speciesist prejudice against empirical evidence.
     

  • 340-102-MQ
    Concepts of Humanity
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    (Prerequisite: 340-101-MQ)
    A survey of the history of philosophy as it pertains to how humanity has come to understand itself morally, metaphysically, psychologically, spiritually, and epistemologically. Topics discussed may include (but are not restricted to) nominalism, humanism, attitudes towards the Ancients and towards the future, empiricism, rationalism, modernity, existentialism, and/or post-modernity.
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 383-920-RE
    Macroeconomics
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces concepts necessary for understanding the Canadian economy within a global context, and the various government policies used to manage it. It also introduces the basic economic problems all countries face, and how various countries differ in their approach to solutions (e. g., capitalist, socialist). Major focuses are the key variables that reflect Canadian economic health (i.e., inflation, national output/income (GDP), and unemployment), and how government policy attempts to improve economic performance in these areas. Included will be the analysis of consumer and firm spending, government fiscal and monetary policy, the banking system and international trade/finance. 
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-302-HR
    Social Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    In this course we will explore how people think about, influence and relate to one another. We will focus on issues such as social beliefs and judgments, social behaviours and attitudes, group influences, aggression, attraction and intimacy, and prejudice.
     

  • 350-304-HR
    Selected Topics in Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    This application course will provide an opportunity for students to explore selected topics in Psychology at a more advanced level.  It will build upon the content of the Introduction to Psychology course.  Each selected topic will deal with a different area of psychology.  This course will provide students with an opportunity to apply concepts and theories to specific topics within the field of Psychology.
     

  • 387-301-HR
    Deviance and Social Control
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    The study of deviance and crime is a specialized area of sociology. After completing the Introduction to sociology course, students are now encouraged to apply sociological theories and other theories from criminology to look at deviance, crime, and social control. Students will explore areas of debate on who makes and who breaks the rules, who gets punished and how, how crime is measured, and how laws change over time. Current and historical events provide the springboard to applying the sociological perspective to understand deviance, crime, criminals, organized crime groups, as well as the structures of policing and the justice system.
     

Choose Two of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 381-201-HR
    Selected Topics in Anthropology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 381-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Global issues such as gender inequalities, race and racism, post-colonialism and the survival of indigenous people are examined in cross-cultural and evolutionary perspectives in tribal and industrialized societies. This analysis course connects cultural and physical anthropology and focuses on facts, complex interrelationships, world views and potential solutions.
     

  • 387-203-HR
    Sex, Race, Class – Diversity and Inequality
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Diversity is a major feature of Canadian society. Each of us is situated in the social ranking by virtue of our age, sex, ethnicity and social class background. In this analysis course, students examine the facts of social inequality in Canada and learn theories to explain the causes and consequences of these inequalities.
     

  • 385-203-HR
    Modern Political Ideologies
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 385-102-HR, only for Social Science program)
    This analysis level course subjects our political society and its ideological foundations to critical scrutiny.  Beginning with the ideological roots of our liberal democracy, this course analyzes the main ideological challenges and alternatives to liberalism from a comparative perspective.  Topics include conservatism, Marxist and non-Marxist socialism, feminism, nationalism, and the politics of ethnic and regional identity.  This course then analyzes the ways in which these alternatives influence contemporary socio-political situations on a local, national, and international level.   
     

  • 330-201-HR
    Twentieth Century History
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-Requisite: Western Civilization)
    This analysis level course builds upon the concepts and practices of a historian by turning a critical eye towards the major social and political events that underpin contemporary society.  From the imperial epoch of Europe and the post-WWI rise of political extremism, through to the post-Cold War challenges of nation-building and ethnic conflict, this course analyzes the roots of contemporary society from a global perspective.  Topics under investigation include the Cold War division of Europe, revolutionary East Asia, de-colonization, the collapse of the Soviet empire, and the emergence of a global economy.    
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 340-CXB-HR
    Theories of Social Justice(for Social Science and Commerce students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course explores the nature and function of ethical inquiry, views of social justice and their application to specific issues relevant to the field of social science. 
     

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-CXB-HR
    Social Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    In common with the other Block “B” English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, practical and professional writing, reading and writing across the curriculum while exposing the students to a variety of literary forms. This course deals with issues relevant in the study of Social Sciences/Commerce, though the focus remains solidly on literature. 
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 990-300-01
    Program Exit Assessment

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-402-HR
    Developmental Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    This application course investigates development from conception through middle childhood. The influences of heredity, environment, family, school and social experiences will be examined from the perspectives of the physical, psycho-social and cognitive domains. Students will continue to develop their skills in writing formal research papers in psychology.
     

  • 300-A02-HR
    Integration of Knowledge in the Social Sciences
    2 1/3
    1-2-4
    2 1/3
    1-2-4

    (Prerequisites: 360-300-RE and a minimum of two (2) analysis/application (022R/022S) courses from two (2) different Social Science disciplines. In addition, successful completion of 300-A01-HR is highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite to Integration, and that its successful completion now becomes a co-requisite for Integration, if not completed prior to taking the Integration course)

    In the final semester of the Program, students are required to successfully complete the Integration course. In this course, students demonstrate their ability to analyze problems in the Social Sciences from an interdisciplinary point of view, in oral and written formats. Applying facts, concepts, theories and research methodologies, with appropriate levels of analysis, students execute learning activities that illustrate their knowledge of the similarities and differences between the seven disciplines in the Program. This capstone course prepares the graduating student to complete the Program Exit Assessment.

     

     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 385-301-HR
    International Politics
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 385-102-HR, only for Social Science program)
    This application level course builds upon and applies the fundamental concepts and theories of Political Science within an international framework. This course focuses on the theoretical and conceptual approaches to state and international security, diplomacy, international law, and the global economy. This course then seeks to apply these theories and concepts to concrete situations confronting international security, such as armed intervention, economic integration and sustainable development, terrorism, humanitarianism, and the role of international organizations. Specific attention will be paid to Canada’s role within the international political order.      
     

  • 101-901-RE
    The Human Body (Biology)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    Every day we perform a balancing act.  It is an amazing performance, and it goes on continually without a break or intermission.  Every part of our physical body is involved in this balance that is constantly challenged by injury, disease, physical and mental stress.  This course addresses how the body attempts to maintain a balanced state.  It outlines the necessary integration of the body’s organ systems, develops an understanding of how the human body functions, and clearly demonstrates how the scientific method can be used to study current health issues.

  • 387-302-HR
    Media and Popular Culture
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Media shape our daily lives, culture, and public opinion. In this sociology course, students will apply the tools of cultural and media analysis to explore ways in which we communicate – including television, radio, internet-based social networking sites, and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Furthermore, sociological concepts and theories will be applied to popular culture phenomena and culture industries.
     


Program content for Social Science with Math Profile

In the first semester of your program, you will take a variety of social science courses that will introduce you to the basic theories and concepts of the disciplines in the program. In the second and third semester, you will take Calculus I and Linear Algebra, as well as other core social science courses. In the fourth semester of the program, you will complete your studies with an in-depth look at how the disciplines in the social sciences can be applied to real world issues. You will get the opportunity to integrate your knowledge from different disciplines to help understand the causes and the consequences of any societal issue that you choose to analyze.

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 330-910-RE
    Western Civilization
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (This course is a required course for Social Science program.)
    Social Science students in this initiation course examine the major forces that have shaped the culture and institutions of western civilization. Course material seeks to show how its institutions and ideologies have evolved over time using the achievements of individuals and cultures. The relevance of past issues to contemporary life is also discussed. 
     

  • 387-101-HR
    Introduction to Sociology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    How are our personal experiences and choices shaped by the society we live in?  And how much power do we have to change the status quo?  This course introduces students to sociological theories and research showing how society shapes us and how we, in turn, shape society.   Topics vary to keep the course relevant to current issues, and may include: sexualities, racial inequality, gender issues, poverty, and other aspects of our changing society.  
     

  • 350-102-RE
    Introduction to Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation course consists of an empirically and theoretically based study of human behaviour and mental processes. As a general introduction to psychology, major topics include learning, memory, perception, consciousness, thought and language, and the biological dimensions of being human. This course introduces students to writing formal research papers in Psychology.
     

  • 360-300-RE
    Methods I (only for Social Science Program)
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    Methods I is an initiation course that teaches students the scientific method and its application within the Social Sciences. Students learn to apply and to interpret statistical procedures; to differentiate the various sampling methods and to explain their respective uses; to interpret bivariate frequency distributions; to distinguish between causation and correlation; and, to become critical consumers of statistical information in the social world. The Methods I course is designed to introduce students to the prescribed stages of Social Science research. This course provides students with the tools necessary to shift from anecdotal explanations of the social world to the scientific analysis. Students learn to use SPSS, a statistical software package used extensively in Social Science Research, required in the Social Sciences. 
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 340-101-MQ
    Philosophy and Rationality
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course studies the use of language and thought in relation to reasoning and argumentation. It also explores the birth of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece, the transition from mythology to philosophy and from philosophy of nature to ethics and metaphysics. Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, are among the philosophers covered in different sections of this course. 
     

  • 603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Throughout this course, we will study literature as a way of exploring the varied connections between sport and human nature.  Readings for the course will consist of novels, poems, and stories (fictional or not) that present central themes surrounding athletic competition.  We will discuss sport as a metaphor for life and cover topics including the following:  obsessive fandom, tribalism, the heroic glory of achievement, and the fear of failure.  We will examine the ways in which sport highlights the best and the worst of human behavior.

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-203-HR
    Abnormal Psychology (Prerequisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    In this analysis course, mental health and corresponding disorders are examined. Course material explores the symptoms, courses, treatments and the prevention of psychological disorders. Topics include historical perspectives of abnormal behaviour, the concepts of normalcy and abnormality, personality disorders, anxiety and mood disorders. The implications of mental health are also addressed. Students will continue to develop their skills in writing formal research papers in psychology.
     

  • 300-A01-HR
    Methods II
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 360-300-RE, only for Social Science program)
    The Methods II course follows the Methods I course enabling students to further their understanding and application of the scientific method in Social Science research. In this team-taught course, students learn both qualitative and quantitative approaches to Social Science research. In addition to in-class lab assignments and regular testing, students must conduct original research and submit a scholarly report on this research. Students gain valuable experience in conducting library research, distinguishing between peer-reviewed research and other publications, conducting a literature review, and writing abstracts, among other steps involved in the research process.
     

  • 201-103-RE
    Differential and Integral Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a course in Differential Calculus designed for students in Social Science, Commerce, and Liberal Arts. The course starts by reviewing the properties of different functions and their graphs. The derivative is used to solve optimization and related rates problems from Business, Economics, and the Social Sciences.

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 381-101-HR
    Cultural Anthropology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    The major objective of this initiation course is to introduce the basic concepts of cultural anthropology in order to understand and appreciate cultural diversity in a globalized world. Topics include: strategies of adaptation, political organization, religion and ritual, marriage and kinship, health, language, and migration.
     

  • 385-102-HR
    Introduction to Political Science
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation level course introduces students to the fundamental concepts, theories and methodologies of Political Science.  From a Canadian comparative perspective, it identifies and develops an understanding of the foundations of political life by focusing on institutions, structures of governance, and civic participation in a democracy, and it seeks to apply this understanding to contemporary issues facing Canadians.  Topics include sovereignty and constitutionalism, federalism and regionalism, the party system, and multiculturalism.  Specific attention will be paid to the role of Quebec within the national political framework.  For students seeking to continue in the discipline of Political Science, this course provides a base for a more advanced understanding of the human phenomenon from a political perspective. 
     

  • 320-102-HR
    Environmental Geography
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    Humans and their societies shape the world around them in profound ways, resulting in significant challenges to long-term environmental sustainability.  This course introduces students to geographical theories and research that help make sense of contemporary environmental challenges such as climate change, population growth, and the hunger-obesity paradox.  Students examine various environmental issues and assess strategies for adapting to and resolving environmental challenges at the local and global levels.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 603-103-MQ / 603-330-HR
    The Literary Animal
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    The presence of non-human creatures in our daily lives has always challenged our most-cherished notions of human uniqueness and complicated our attitudes towards the world we share with these creatures.  This course studies some of the ways in which writers have tried to address the contradictions implicit in a human worldview that sets speciesist prejudice against empirical evidence.
     

  • 340-102-MQ
    Concepts of Humanity
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    (Prerequisite: 340-101-MQ)
    A survey of the history of philosophy as it pertains to how humanity has come to understand itself morally, metaphysically, psychologically, spiritually, and epistemologically. Topics discussed may include (but are not restricted to) nominalism, humanism, attitudes towards the Ancients and towards the future, empiricism, rationalism, modernity, existentialism, and/or post-modernity.
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-105-RE
    Linear Algebra
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    Matrices and determinants are introduced to solve systems of linear equations. Vectors in Euclidean space, scalar products and vector products are used to study geometry in two and three dimensions. Optional topics and applications include Markov chains, Leontief Economic models and linear programming.

  • 383-920-RE
    Macroeconomics
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces concepts necessary for understanding the Canadian economy within a global context, and the various government policies used to manage it. It also introduces the basic economic problems all countries face, and how various countries differ in their approach to solutions (e. g., capitalist, socialist). Major focuses are the key variables that reflect Canadian economic health (i.e., inflation, national output/income (GDP), and unemployment), and how government policy attempts to improve economic performance in these areas. Included will be the analysis of consumer and firm spending, government fiscal and monetary policy, the banking system and international trade/finance. 
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-302-HR
    Social Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    In this course we will explore how people think about, influence and relate to one another. We will focus on issues such as social beliefs and judgments, social behaviours and attitudes, group influences, aggression, attraction and intimacy, and prejudice.
     

  • 350-304-HR
    Selected Topics in Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    This application course will provide an opportunity for students to explore selected topics in Psychology at a more advanced level.  It will build upon the content of the Introduction to Psychology course.  Each selected topic will deal with a different area of psychology.  This course will provide students with an opportunity to apply concepts and theories to specific topics within the field of Psychology.
     

  • 387-301-HR
    Deviance and Social Control
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    The study of deviance and crime is a specialized area of sociology. After completing the Introduction to sociology course, students are now encouraged to apply sociological theories and other theories from criminology to look at deviance, crime, and social control. Students will explore areas of debate on who makes and who breaks the rules, who gets punished and how, how crime is measured, and how laws change over time. Current and historical events provide the springboard to applying the sociological perspective to understand deviance, crime, criminals, organized crime groups, as well as the structures of policing and the justice system.
     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 381-201-HR
    Selected Topics in Anthropology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 381-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Global issues such as gender inequalities, race and racism, post-colonialism and the survival of indigenous people are examined in cross-cultural and evolutionary perspectives in tribal and industrialized societies. This analysis course connects cultural and physical anthropology and focuses on facts, complex interrelationships, world views and potential solutions.
     

  • 387-203-HR
    Sex, Race, Class – Diversity and Inequality
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Diversity is a major feature of Canadian society. Each of us is situated in the social ranking by virtue of our age, sex, ethnicity and social class background. In this analysis course, students examine the facts of social inequality in Canada and learn theories to explain the causes and consequences of these inequalities.
     

  • 385-203-HR
    Modern Political Ideologies
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 385-102-HR, only for Social Science program)
    This analysis level course subjects our political society and its ideological foundations to critical scrutiny.  Beginning with the ideological roots of our liberal democracy, this course analyzes the main ideological challenges and alternatives to liberalism from a comparative perspective.  Topics include conservatism, Marxist and non-Marxist socialism, feminism, nationalism, and the politics of ethnic and regional identity.  This course then analyzes the ways in which these alternatives influence contemporary socio-political situations on a local, national, and international level.   
     

  • 330-201-HR
    Twentieth Century History
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-Requisite: Western Civilization)
    This analysis level course builds upon the concepts and practices of a historian by turning a critical eye towards the major social and political events that underpin contemporary society.  From the imperial epoch of Europe and the post-WWI rise of political extremism, through to the post-Cold War challenges of nation-building and ethnic conflict, this course analyzes the roots of contemporary society from a global perspective.  Topics under investigation include the Cold War division of Europe, revolutionary East Asia, de-colonization, the collapse of the Soviet empire, and the emergence of a global economy.    
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 340-CXB-HR
    Theories of Social Justice(for Social Science and Commerce students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course explores the nature and function of ethical inquiry, views of social justice and their application to specific issues relevant to the field of social science. 
     

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    1
    2
  • 603-CXB-HR
    Social Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    In common with the other Block “B” English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, practical and professional writing, reading and writing across the curriculum while exposing the students to a variety of literary forms. This course deals with issues relevant in the study of Social Sciences/Commerce, though the focus remains solidly on literature. 
     

  • 990-300-01
    Program Exit Assessment

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 300-A02-HR
    Integration of Knowledge in the Social Sciences
    2 1/3
    1-2-4
    2 1/3
    1-2-4

    (Prerequisites: 360-300-RE and a minimum of two (2) analysis/application (022R/022S) courses from two (2) different Social Science disciplines. In addition, successful completion of 300-A01-HR is highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite to Integration, and that its successful completion now becomes a co-requisite for Integration, if not completed prior to taking the Integration course)

    In the final semester of the Program, students are required to successfully complete the Integration course. In this course, students demonstrate their ability to analyze problems in the Social Sciences from an interdisciplinary point of view, in oral and written formats. Applying facts, concepts, theories and research methodologies, with appropriate levels of analysis, students execute learning activities that illustrate their knowledge of the similarities and differences between the seven disciplines in the Program. This capstone course prepares the graduating student to complete the Program Exit Assessment.

     

     

Choose One of the Following

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 350-402-HR
    Developmental Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 350-102-RE, only for Social Science program)
    This application course investigates development from conception through middle childhood. The influences of heredity, environment, family, school and social experiences will be examined from the perspectives of the physical, psycho-social and cognitive domains. Students will continue to develop their skills in writing formal research papers in psychology.
     

  • 385-301-HR
    International Politics
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Prerequisite: 385-102-HR, only for Social Science program)
    This application level course builds upon and applies the fundamental concepts and theories of Political Science within an international framework. This course focuses on the theoretical and conceptual approaches to state and international security, diplomacy, international law, and the global economy. This course then seeks to apply these theories and concepts to concrete situations confronting international security, such as armed intervention, economic integration and sustainable development, terrorism, humanitarianism, and the role of international organizations. Specific attention will be paid to Canada’s role within the international political order.      
     

  • 101-901-RE
    The Human Body (Biology)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    Every day we perform a balancing act.  It is an amazing performance, and it goes on continually without a break or intermission.  Every part of our physical body is involved in this balance that is constantly challenged by injury, disease, physical and mental stress.  This course addresses how the body attempts to maintain a balanced state.  It outlines the necessary integration of the body’s organ systems, develops an understanding of how the human body functions, and clearly demonstrates how the scientific method can be used to study current health issues.

  • 387-302-HR
    Media and Popular Culture
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (Pre-requisite: 387-101-HR, only for Social Science program)
    Media shape our daily lives, culture, and public opinion. In this sociology course, students will apply the tools of cultural and media analysis to explore ways in which we communicate – including television, radio, internet-based social networking sites, and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). Furthermore, sociological concepts and theories will be applied to popular culture phenomena and culture industries.
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program content for Social Science Commerce Profile

In the first semester of your program, you will take a variety of social science courses that will introduce you to the basic theories and concepts of the disciplines in the program. In the first semester, as well as in each of the remaining three semesters, you will take one Administration course as part of your other core social science courses. In addition, during the program you will take two courses in Calculus and one in Linear Algebra. In the fourth semester of the program, you will complete your studies with an in-depth look at how the disciplines in the social sciences can be applied to real world issues. You will get the opportunity to integrate your knowledge from different disciplines to help understand the causes and the consequences of any societal issue that you choose to analyze.

Semester

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    602-XXX-MQ
    French
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3
  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

  • 340-101-MQ
    Philosophy and Rationality
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course studies the use of language and thought in relation to reasoning and argumentation. It also explores the birth of philosophical reasoning in ancient Greece, the transition from mythology to philosophy and from philosophy of nature to ethics and metaphysics. Pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, are among the philosophers covered in different sections of this course. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 360-300-RE
    Methods I (only for Social Science Program)
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    Methods I is an initiation course that teaches students the scientific method and its application within the Social Sciences. Students learn to apply and to interpret statistical procedures; to differentiate the various sampling methods and to explain their respective uses; to interpret bivariate frequency distributions; to distinguish between causation and correlation; and, to become critical consumers of statistical information in the social world. The Methods I course is designed to introduce students to the prescribed stages of Social Science research. This course provides students with the tools necessary to shift from anecdotal explanations of the social world to the scientific analysis. Students learn to use SPSS, a statistical software package used extensively in Social Science Research, required in the Social Sciences. 
     

  • 350-102-RE
    Introduction to Psychology
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This initiation course consists of an empirically and theoretically based study of human behaviour and mental processes. As a general introduction to psychology, major topics include learning, memory, perception, consciousness, thought and language, and the biological dimensions of being human. This course introduces students to writing formal research papers in Psychology.
     

  • 401-101-HR
    Introduction to Commerce
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces the student to the field of business administration. More specifically, the student will explore the nature of business from both a Canadian and a global perspective.  Students will be introduced to the options for organizing a business, the nature of management and the different functional areas of the business organization.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

  • 603-102-MQ / 603-233-HR
    Sport and Literature
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    Throughout this course, we will study literature as a way of exploring the varied connections between sport and human nature.  Readings for the course will consist of novels, poems, and stories (fictional or not) that present central themes surrounding athletic competition.  We will discuss sport as a metaphor for life and cover topics including the following:  obsessive fandom, tribalism, the heroic glory of achievement, and the fear of failure.  We will examine the ways in which sport highlights the best and the worst of human behavior.

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 383-920-RE
    Macroeconomics
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course introduces concepts necessary for understanding the Canadian economy within a global context, and the various government policies used to manage it. It also introduces the basic economic problems all countries face, and how various countries differ in their approach to solutions (e. g., capitalist, socialist). Major focuses are the key variables that reflect Canadian economic health (i.e., inflation, national output/income (GDP), and unemployment), and how government policy attempts to improve economic performance in these areas. Included will be the analysis of consumer and firm spending, government fiscal and monetary policy, the banking system and international trade/finance. 
     

  • 201-103-RE
    Differential and Integral Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a course in Differential Calculus designed for students in Social Science, Commerce, and Liberal Arts. The course starts by reviewing the properties of different functions and their graphs. The derivative is used to solve optimization and related rates problems from Business, Economics, and the Social Sciences.

  • 300-A01-HR
    Methods II
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 360-300-RE, only for Social Science program)
    The Methods II course follows the Methods I course enabling students to further their understanding and application of the scientific method in Social Science research. In this team-taught course, students learn both qualitative and quantitative approaches to Social Science research. In addition to in-class lab assignments and regular testing, students must conduct original research and submit a scholarly report on this research. Students gain valuable experience in conducting library research, distinguishing between peer-reviewed research and other publications, conducting a literature review, and writing abstracts, among other steps involved in the research process.
     

  • 401-A02-HR
    Financial Accounting
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course introduces students to the area of financial accounting.  Upon completion of the course, students will have a strong understanding of the accounting cycle, from journalizing through to the preparation of financial statements.  The application of International Financial Reporting Standards will be stressed throughout the course.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

  • 603-103-MQ / 603-330-HR
    The Literary Animal
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3

    The presence of non-human creatures in our daily lives has always challenged our most-cherished notions of human uniqueness and complicated our attitudes towards the world we share with these creatures.  This course studies some of the ways in which writers have tried to address the contradictions implicit in a human worldview that sets speciesist prejudice against empirical evidence.
     

  • 340-102-MQ
    Concepts of Humanity
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    (Prerequisite: 340-101-MQ)
    A survey of the history of philosophy as it pertains to how humanity has come to understand itself morally, metaphysically, psychologically, spiritually, and epistemologically. Topics discussed may include (but are not restricted to) nominalism, humanism, attitudes towards the Ancients and towards the future, empiricism, rationalism, modernity, existentialism, and/or post-modernity.
     

  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 330-910-RE
    Western Civilization
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    (This course is a required course for Social Science program.)
    Social Science students in this initiation course examine the major forces that have shaped the culture and institutions of western civilization. Course material seeks to show how its institutions and ideologies have evolved over time using the achievements of individuals and cultures. The relevance of past issues to contemporary life is also discussed. 
     

  • 201-105-RE
    Linear Algebra
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    Matrices and determinants are introduced to solve systems of linear equations. Vectors in Euclidean space, scalar products and vector products are used to study geometry in two and three dimensions. Optional topics and applications include Markov chains, Leontief Economic models and linear programming.

  • 401-A03-HR
    Marketing
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course focuses on the determination, understanding, and satisfaction of client needs. Following an integrated marketing approach, the course includes defining product and service needs, assessing consumer behaviour patterns, developing branding strategies, creating promotional plans, and managing effective marketing communication channels.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 201-203-RE
    Differential and Integral Calculus II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

     

    (Prerequisite: 201-103-RE or 201-NYA-05)

    This course continues the study of limits with the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It covers techniques of integration, improper integrals, and application to areas, economics, and finance. Approximation techniques using differentials and Taylor and Maclaurin series are also introduced together with differential equations.

  • 383-301-HR
    Microeconomics
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    This course is concerned with the determination of prices, output and employment within individual commodity and factor markets. It delves into the motivating forces behind actions of producers and consumers who are the principles in market interactions. Topics to be covered are: supply and demand, consumer behaviour, production/cost, market structure and pricing. 
     

  • 300-A02-HR
    Integration of Knowledge in the Social Sciences
    2 1/3
    1-2-4
    2 1/3
    1-2-4

    (Prerequisites: 360-300-RE and a minimum of two (2) analysis/application (022R/022S) courses from two (2) different Social Science disciplines. In addition, successful completion of 300-A01-HR is highly recommended but not required as a prerequisite to Integration, and that its successful completion now becomes a co-requisite for Integration, if not completed prior to taking the Integration course)

    In the final semester of the Program, students are required to successfully complete the Integration course. In this course, students demonstrate their ability to analyze problems in the Social Sciences from an interdisciplinary point of view, in oral and written formats. Applying facts, concepts, theories and research methodologies, with appropriate levels of analysis, students execute learning activities that illustrate their knowledge of the similarities and differences between the seven disciplines in the Program. This capstone course prepares the graduating student to complete the Program Exit Assessment.

     

     

  • 401-A01-HR
    Human Resource Management
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course introduces students to human resources management and the role of the HR professional in today’s business context.  Students will develop competencies in human resources planning, recruitment, selection, training and development, performance management, and compensation. 
     

Learning spaces and resources

Student success is important to us! We offer individual assistance and group workshops to support our students. One-on-one tutoring in the Birgil Learning Center is available for all Social Science students. Workshops offered throughout each academic year for students looking for additional learning opportunities are planned, created, and delivered by our Social Science teachers.

Admission requirements

Admission requirements for the Social Science - General Profile and With Mathematics Profile program vary depending on if you are a Quebec-resident, out-of-province applicant, or international applicant. Please review all general and program-specfic requirements before applying. 

Interested?

We'd love to show you everything Cégep Heritage College has to offer. If you'd like to know more about this program, you can: