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Program Content

The Electronics & Information Technology (EIT) program helps you grow as an Engineering Technologist. When you enter the program, courses will focus on understanding the fundamentals of electronics, information technology (IT), programing, and the profession itself at both, theory and hands-on levels . In your second year, you will use acquired knowledge from the previous year to build an electronics project, program a micro-controller, and install/operate a computer network. During your third year, you will apply your skills by developing and implementing an idea during your final year project. This process will help you expand your time management habits, technical report writing skills, and project planning processes. 

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    1
    2
  • 603-101-MQ
    Introduction to College English
    2 2/3
    2-2-4
    2 2/3
    2-2-4

    This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings. 
     

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-E11-HR
    IT Essentials
    3
    3-3-3
    3
    3-3-3

    This course provides an introduction to computer components, laptops, portable devices, wireless connectivity, security and diagnostic tools. It also helps students prepare for the CompTIA A+ certification.
     

  • 243-J11-HR
    Technologist as a Profession
    1 2/3
    2-2-1
    1 2/3
    2-2-1

        This course helps students to plan a career path in electronics and information technology. Students will become familiar with the electro-technical field and language, and understand the vital role a technologist has in an engineering and IT environment.
     

  • 243-G11-HR
    Analog Circuits I
    3
    3-3-3
    3
    3-3-3

    This course introduces fundamental laws and principles in electronic circuits such as Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws; Thevenin, Norton and superposition Theorems; the voltage and current divider rules. Student will examine these in a practical environment through experimentation.
     

  • 243-C11-HR
    Microprocessor I
    2 1/3
    2-3-2
    2 1/3
    2-3-2

    This course covers programming microcontrollers/ microprocessors in the C programming language. Students learn to design, code, and test simple structured programs. Topics include data types, formatted Input/Output, operators, expressions, loops, functions, structures, array, pointers and memory management.
     

  • 201-E01-HR
    Math for Electronics
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary IV Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)
    This course is designed for first-year Electronics Technology students who have not taken or passed the secondary V Mathematics course: Technical and Scientific or Science Options. It provides the tools necessary for their program with emphasis on real valued functions and their applications to Electronics.

  • 201-NYA-05
    Calculus I
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    This is a standard first course in Differential Calculus. It introduces the concept of limits for sequences and functions and, in particular, studies the derivative and its applications in analyzing functions and in solving related rate and optimization problems.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    603-102-MQ
    Literary Genres
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
    2 1/3
    2-2-3
  • 345-101-MQ
    Knowledge
    2 1/3
    3-1-3
    2 1/3
    3-1-3

    This course’s emphasis is on how knowledge is defined, acquired, transmitted and applied. Students examine both messages and media to identify the strengths and limitations of each. Students learn to situate knowledge in a social, historical and personal context, a skill they will need in order to become lifelong learners. 

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-J22-HR
    Workplace Preparation
    2 2/3
    1-4-3
    2 2/3
    1-4-3

    This course prepares the student for the two co-op work terms and introduces them to local employers in the high-tech industries and federal government. Students develop job hunting skills through resume writing, mock interviews and portfolio preparation.
     

  • 243-E32-HR
    Networks I
    2 ⅔
    3-2-3
    2 ⅔
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 243-E11-HR)
    This course focuses on installing, configuring, and administering Windows server 2012. 
     

  • 243-G22-HR
    Analog Circuits II
    3
    3-3-3
    3
    3-3-3

    (Prerequisite: 243-G11-HR)

    This course examines AC circuits and extends the resistor-based analysis techniques presented in Analog Circuits I to steady state analysis of inductors and capacitors. Transient analysis of these reactive components is also covered. Circuit theory will be reinforced through laboratory experiments and circuit simulation.

  • 243-D12-HR
    Digital Circuits I
    2 1/3
    2-3-2
    2 1/3
    2-3-2

    This is the foundation course in digital system design theory. Students will learn and apply the concepts of combinatorial logic by learning and applying logic gates such as NAND, NOR and EXCLUSIVE OR, and utilize circuit minimization techniques using Karnaugh Mapping and De-Morgan’s Theorem.
     

  • 243-E22-HR
    Operating Systems Administration
    2
    2-3-1
    2
    2-3-1

    (Prerequisite: 243-B14-HR)
    This course covers the installation, maintenance & administration of operating systems with emphasis on Linux and Microsoft Windows. Students will also learn about the latest operating system level virtualization tools.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-J33-HR
    Computer Aided Design
    2
    1-3-2
    2
    1-3-2

    (Prerequisites: 243-G11-HR, 243-D12-HR)

    This is an introductory course in computer aided schematic and printed circuit board (PCB) design using high-level design software.  The student will learn and apply the various design techniques for single layer and multi-layer PCBs that include through-hole and surface mount components.

     

  • 243-D23-HR
    Digital Circuits II
    2 ⅔
    3-3-2
    2 ⅔
    3-3-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-D12-HR)

    This course will allow the student to use combinatorial and sequential logic devices and design techniques to implement digital circuits.

  • 243-G33-HR
    Analog Circuits III
    3
    3-3-3
    3
    3-3-3

    (Prerequisite: 243-G22-HR)
    This course introduces active circuits to the analog stream. This course specifically examines circuits that utilize non-linear devices such as, diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), field effect transistors (FET), operational amplifiers, oscillators, active filters, A/D and D/A converters, and voltage regulators.
     

  • 243-C23-HR
    Embedded Programming
    2 1/3
    2-3-2
    2 1/3
    2-3-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-C11-HR)
    This course teaches C++ programming with an emphasis on object-oriented programming (OOP) in a high-level language. The OOP methodology will be emphasized and used to develop console based applications.
     

  • 201-CWF-05
    Pre-Calculus (Introduction to College Math)
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific or Science Options or equivalent)

    The emphasis in this course is given to the concept of a function and its graph. The functions studied include: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric and their inverses. Algebra skills required in calculus are covered and vectors are introduced.

  • 201-NYB-05
    Calculus II
    2 2/3
    3-2-3
    2 2/3
    3-2-3

    (Prerequisite: 201-103-RE or 201-NYA-05)

    This course continues the study of limits with the definite integral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It covers techniques of integration, improper integrals, and application to areas, volumes, and arc length. Approximation techniques using differentials and Taylor and Maclaurin series are also introduced together with differential equations.

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 109-101-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 1 Physical Activity and Health
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    Physical activity and health is an introductory course that combines a variety of physical activities in order to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  Stress management, motivational factors, weight management, and nutrition are some of the topics that complement the weekly activities.  Students are expected to participate to the best of their ability in a fun-filled environment. The following activities may be offered:  Soccer, Ultimate, Volleyball, Hockey, Ringette, Basketball, Lacrosse, Snowshoeing, Hiking, Cross country running, Rollerblading, Weight training, Circuit/Core training, Yoga, Pilates, Badminton, Flexibility, and Relaxation.

     

  • 602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    602-XXX-HR
    French
    1
    2
    1
    2
  • Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    Complementary
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-J44-HR
    Product Development
    2
    1-3-2
    2
    1-3-2

    (Prerequisites: 243-J33-HR,)

    The student will use computer software to create working schematics and printed circuit board (PCB) artwork at an advanced-to-intermediate level.  The student will assemble a PCB then use machine shop and electronics test equipment to realize a full featured electronic product designated by the department.

  • 243-E44-HR
    Networks II
    2 ⅓
    23-3-3
    2 ⅓
    23-3-3

    (Prerequisite: 243-E11-HR)
    This course introduces concepts of networking technologies such as routers, LAN switches, Wireless LANs, IP addressing & subnetting, and WAN concepts and configuration. It also helps you master the topics on the Cisco CCENT/CCNA ICND1 exam.

  • 243-C34-HR
    Microprocessor II
    2 1/3
    2-3-2
    2 1/3
    2-3-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-C11-HR)
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of microprocessors. Both hardware and software aspects of microprocessor based design are covered and include microprocessor hardware interfacing & design, as well as embedded software development techniques.
     

  • 243-D34-HR
    Digital Circuits III
    2 ⅔
    2-3-3
    2 ⅔
    2-3-3

    (Prerequisite: 243-D23-HR)
    This course introduces AHDL and VHDL high level description languages to program PLDs, and FPGAs for the design of digital systems.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 345-102-MQ
    World Views
    2
    3-0-3
    2
    3-0-3

    The course focuses on how individuals, groups, societies or nations organize ideas, perceptions and values into explanatory patterns. Students explore major ideas and value systems by which diverse individuals, groups, societies or nations seek to explain the world and their place in it. 
     

  • 109-102-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 2 Physical Activity and Effectiveness
    1
    0-2-1
    1
    0-2-1

    The purpose of the second set is to encourage students to use a goal-oriented approach to improve the effectiveness of a physical activity whether it is a sport, corporal expression or an outdoor activity. After an initial assessment, students evaluate the physical activity in terms of their ability and attitudes; they set goals and try an approach aimed at improving their motor skills, their technique or their mastery of complex strategies. Finally, students are called upon to assess their progress.

     

    Each of the following activities will be offered for a 15 week period.

     

    Badminton involves the introduction of skills including serving, underhand and overhead strokes, rules and etiquette of the game and basic strategies of singles and doubles play.

     

    Basketball involves an introduction to the fundamentals of passing and receiving, dribbling, shooting and basic team play both offensively and defensively.   Rules and strategy will be covered.

     

    Circuit/”Cross Fit” Training

     This course provides a great opportunity to work out with a group in a friendly setting, with motivating music, where everyone works to his/her own capacity. Workouts will consist of circuit type training based on a fixed amount of time, i.e. 10 exercises, 1 minute each and “cross fit” type training where a fixed amount of work is pre-established i.e., 8 exercises, 25 repetitions each. The resistance used will be of personal choice and/or body weight. Ultimately all workouts will provide both cardiovascular and muscular strength/endurance benefits, resulting in a very functional form of fitness.

     

    Mind/Body/Fitness

    Students will experience a blend of disciplines such as pilates, meditation with movement and massage with various relaxation techniques.  The course aims to increase cardiovascular and muscular strength while developing  awareness of mind, body and spirit.

     

    Snow Sports involves learning the skills and strategies to comfortably use the winter environment to travel over snow and ice. Snow sports will include cross country skiing, snowshoeing, and skating in the Gatineau Park and surrounding facilities. Exercising in cold weather conditions requires an understanding of proper nutrition, safety management, cold weather injuries, and dressing techniques; all topics that are covered in the course.  This course will be offered for three hours per week for 10 weeks. This is a true Canadian experience. 

     

    Soccer is a team sport that involves the use of both physical and mental skills. The class will focus on the fundamentals of team concepts, individual passing, shooting, ball control and fitness.  Basic theoretical knowledge of game play and rules will also be covered.

     

    Outdoor Pursuits will allow students to experience the health advantages and adventure of outdoor based activities. Exercising in the outdoors boosts the immune system, increases cognitive function and motivation while lowering stress levels. Students will work towards building their muscular and cardiovascular endurance through a range of fitness training activities as well as building their skills and confidence in the outdoor environment.

     

    Team Sports focuses on the progression of fundamental skills,. Team Sports is comprised of three different activities each lasting five weeks, to be determined by the individual teacher. Three of the following sports could be offered: Soccer, Hockey, Volleyball, Basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

     

    Rock Climbing will introduce students to the safety and techniques of bouldering and top-rope climbing in an indoor gym. As a condensed course format, the class will be held as 10, 3 hour classes, 7 of which will be off campus at Altitude Gym on 35 Boulevard Saint-Raymond. The students will be responsible for their transportation to and from the gym. The students will work on their strength, technique, balance and endurance while working on goals that they will set for themselves. 

     

    Volleyball will include the fundamentals of serving, serve reception, volleying, spiking as well as basic team offensive and defensive strategies. Rules and strategies will be covered.

     

    Yoga is a practice that has evolved over a period of approximately 5,000 years dealing with all aspects of health. The term yoga literally means union of mind and body. Throughout the semester, students will be introduced to the many different styles of yoga, focusing on a variety of forward bends, back bending and balancing postures. 

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-J55-HR
    Final Project I
    3
    3-4-2
    3
    3-4-2

    (Prerequisites:, 243-J44-HR)
    In this course students will start developing their own independent electronic design through the application of product development methodology. This includes developing a feasibility study for a microprocessor-based electronic design, writing a specification for it & establishing milestones (deadlines) to be met via a Gant chart.
    On the design side, students will be expected to test the functionality of their design through simulation, complete their printed circuit board (PCB) layout design and have their PCB fabricated, populated and tested at the hardware level.
     

  • 243-C45-HR
    Graphical User Interface Design
    2 ⅓
    2-3-2
    2 ⅓
    2-3-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-C23-HR)
    This course provides students with hands on experience in developing computer applications with friendly graphical user interfaces using state of the art user interface (UI) software development tools. Students will learn the methodologies behind successful UI design.
     

  • 243-E55-HR
    Networks III
    2 ⅓
    2-3-2
    2 ⅓
    2-3-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-E44-HR)

    This course is a continuation for Networks I. It covers VLANs, VLSM, ACLs, Routing protocol theory, frame relay, VPNs, NAT, and IPv6. It also helps students master the topics on the Cisco CCENT/CCNA ICND2 exam.

  • 243-E65-HR
    Wireless Communications
    2 1/3
    3-2-2
    2 1/3
    3-2-2

    (Prerequisites: 243-G33-HR, 243-D23-HR)
    This course covers the various modulation schemes being used to provide wireless service as well as transmission line theory, antenna characteristics, basic microwave theory, and satellite systems.
     

General Education Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 345-CXA-HR
    Values in the Workplace (for Business, Computer Science, Electronics, and NewMedia students)
    2
    2-1-3
    2
    2-1-3

    This course aims to apply different ethical theories, principles, and values to the areas of work and business. The focus is on the requirements for making capitalism more ethically appealing as well as the relation of corporations to other entities such as consumers and the natural environment. Values and virtues like cooperation and fairness are discussed along with the application of an ethical decision-making model to relevant case studies. 

  • 603-CXD-HR
    Professional Milieu
    2
    2-2-2
    2
    2-2-2

    In common with the other Block “B” English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, practical and professional writing, reading and writing across the curriculum while exposing the students to a variety of literary forms. Although the course devotes considerable attention to practical and professional writing, the focus remains solidly on literature. 

  • 109-103-MQ
    Physical Education: Set 3 Physical Activity and Autonomy
    1
    1-1-1
    1
    1-1-1

    (Prerequisites: 109-101-MQ, 109-102-MQ)

    The third physical education course is aimed at integrating physical activity into the student’s daily lifestyle through more effective application of related personal factors (i.e. time management, motivation, nutrition needs, designing an exercise program) that contribute to continued participation.  During scheduled course hours, the student will be introduced to new skills and concepts related to the specific activity chosen.  The student is also expected to maintain regular physical activity outside class hours within a personal activity program under the professor’s supervision by applying the knowledge gained while integrating new course material. 

     

    Canoe Camping 

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day canoe camping trip on local waterways using large ‘voyageur’ style canoes. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, preparing and maintaining fires and filtering water. 

     

    Cycling

    No matter where you are, cycling is a great way to travel and at the same time, benefit from some fresh air and exercise.   In this course we will start off with a couple preliminary outings that will take us into the Gatineau Park with a focus on bike selection, proper positioning and gear use.  In addition, we will select, plan, and divide up some of the responsibilities for an overnight cycle tour in the region.  Also,  students will have planned and managed a personal activity of their choice in a health enhancing approach over the entire semester.

     

    Exercise and Weight Training

    Exercise and Weight Training will allow students to develop and use personalized resistance training and cardiovascular training programs throughout the course. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks that are broken down in to 75% workout/application and 25% lecture. 

     

    Hiking

    This course will allow students to discover the Gatineau Park through many of its hiking trails.  Day hikes will take them to different areas of the park.  Presentations will be made on topics such as First Aid, Nutrition, Water Treatment, Equipment and History. In addition to these topics, students will also be made aware of the geology of the park, local flora and fauna, environmental impact, safety considerations, appropriate clothing and footwear, and basic hiking techniques.

     

    Multi Sports

    This course will encourage students to assume more responsibility for directing and managing their own sport experience.  Students will develop sport-specific techniques and fitness; appreciate and be able to execute sport-specific strategic play; share planning and administration of sport experiences; provide responsible leadership; and develop and apply knowledge about officiating, scorekeeping and training. Classes are in two hour weekly blocks.

     

    Outdoor Adventures and Meditation Retreat

    This course will emphasize the importance of mind and body awareness through a broad range of activities which include yoga, meditation, relaxation, and massage therapy.  In addition,  hiking and orienteering in the fall or snowshoeing  and cross-country skiing in the winter at an outdoor facility, will complete the weekend outing.

     

    Snowshoeing

    Snowshoeing is a winter activity in which participants wear specially designed gear on their feet which distributes their weight, allowing them to walk more comfortably on the snow. Snowshoeing is an excellent low impact, cardiovascular workout.  Students will explore different types of terrain and visit different cabins in the Gatineau Park.

     

    Stand Up Paddling (SUP)

    Stand Up Paddling consists of paddling a large surfboard in an upright position with the help of a long paddle.  It is an emerging activity with its origins in traditional surfing that offers a full body workout and is a fun and exciting way to play on lakes, rivers and ocean surf.   This course will be offered over three weekend day outings.   Paddling techniques, clothing, nutrition, etiquette, and environmental awareness are all included in this package. 

     

     

    Backpacking & Camping

    The group activity portion of this course will consist of a three day hiking trip into Gatineau Park, camping overnight at the Lac Phillipe campground.  Students will be introduced to the basics of preparing and packing for a multi-day hiking excursion and lightweight camping techniques. Students will be involved with various organizational aspects of the trip such as purchasing food, planning and preparing meals, organising evening activities, camp set-up and take down and leave no trace practices.

     

    Winter Camping

    This course will allow students to experience all that winter has to offer. The group activity of this course will consist of two outings; an introductory day to winter systems and a weekend of winter camping. During the overnight outing, the students will have the option of staying in a Gatineau Park heated hut or taking the ultimate challenge of sleeping out in a snow shelter. The group will travel into the park on snowshoes and build their own quinzees (snow shelters).  Topics covered will include snow shelter construction, safety management, cold weather injuries, and effective winter clothing systems.

Program Specific Courses

Code
Course Title
Credit
Weight
  • 243-J66-HR
    Final Project II
    3
    3-4-2
    3
    3-4-2

    (Prerequisite: 243-J55-HR)
    The students will continue on the work done in Final Project I by validating their printed circuit board layout and electronic circuit design. They must further develop and implement their software designs for the microprocessor firmware and graphical user interface that is able to communicate/control their microprocessor-based prototype.
     

  • 243-E76-HR
    Networks IV
    2 2/3
    2-3-2
    2 2/3
    2-3-2

    Prerequisite: 243-E55-HR (Networks III)
    This course focuses on VoIP technologies. Topics include voice and data convergence, IP phone connections, gateways and trunks, and Cisco UC500 series for voice. It also helps you master the topics on the Cisco CCNA Voice exam.
     

  • 243-C56-HR
    LabView Programming
    2
    2-3-1
    2
    2-3-1

    Prerequisite: 243-G11-HR (Analog Circuits I)
    This course introduces students to a powerful system design software built specifically for tasks performed by engineers and scientists. In this course, students will become familiar with the LabView environment and graphical programming. 
     

Co-op option

Our Electronics and Information Technology co-op placements provide you with real-life work experience, greatly improving your ability to secure employment in your field after graduation. During your placement, you'll have the chance to improve and expand your core skillset. In some cases, your co-op position can lead to full-time employment after graduation. Your co-op eligibility will be assessed once you've been admitted to the program.  

Learning spaces and resources

As an Electronics & Information Technology student, you have access to four state of the art labs. Our two IT labs are equipped with physical Cisco equipment to complete hands-on labs with. Out two electronics labs are equipped with oscilloscopes, function generators, power supplies, and soldering irons. Each student in any lab has their own set of equipment to work with. There is also a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) milling machine and a 3D printer.

Additional graduation and program requirements

English exit exam

In order to graduate, you must pass a Ministerial Examination of College English exam.

Program exit assessment

The Program Exit Assessment (PEA) is a final evaluation activity that shows a student’s achievement throughout the program. It requires students to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills gained from their Diploma of College Studies (DEC), as indicated in our College’s policy on student evaluation.

Admission requirements

Admission requirements for the Electronics & Information Technology program vary depending on if you are a Quebec-resident, out-of-province applicant, or international applicant. Please review all general and program-specfic requirements before applying. 

Interested?

We'd love to show you everything Cégep Heritage College has to offer. If you'd like to know more about this program, you can: