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Humanities  

Course Descriptions

Cégep Heritage College offers its students a unique opportunity to take either philosophy or humanities courses, depending on their programs.

Pre-university students take philosophy courses, while students in career programs are required to take humanities courses in order to obtain a Diploma of Collegial Studies (D.E.C.).

BLOCK "A"
HUMANITIES COURSES
Humanities, as part of the core curriculum, are intended to promote personal and social development and to give students a foundation that will help them understand their roles in contemporary society as members of the labour force, citizens and individuals.

All students must take two courses from the list of block “A” courses: one in Humanities 101 and one in Humanities 102.

The following descriptions indicate the general nature of courses in these disciplines, more specific information about the particular sections of these courses being offered in a given semester will be available at registration.

HUMANITIES 101

345-101-MQ      3-1-3      2 1/3 cr.
Knowledge
This course’s emphasis is on how knowledge is defined, acquired, transmitted and applied. Students examine both messages and media to identify the strengths and limitations of each. Students learn to situate knowledge in a social, historical and personal context, a skill they will need in order to become lifelong learners.

HUMANITIES 102

345-102-MQ      3-0-3      2 cr.
World Views
The course focuses on how individuals, groups, societies or nations organize ideas, perceptions and values into explanatory patterns. Students explore major ideas and value systems by which diverse individuals, groups, societies or nations seek to explain the world and their place in it.

BLOCK "B" HUMANITIES COURSES
This course represents the third Humanities course required in order to obtain a college diploma. The curriculum will reflect content specific to the program in which the student is enrolled.

345-CXA-03      2-1-3      2 cr.
Values in the Workplace
(for Business, Computer Science, NewMedia and Electronics students)
This course aims to apply different ethical theories, principles, and values to the areas of work and business. The focus is on the requirements for making capitalism more ethically appealing as well as the relation of corporations to other entities such as consumers and the natural environment. Values and virtues like cooperation and fairness are discussed along with the application of an ethical decision-making model to relevant case studies.

345-CXB-03       2-1-3      2 cr.
Health and Childcare Values
(for ECCE and Nursing students)
This course aims to apply different ethical theories, principles, and values to the areas of health and early child care. The focus is on understanding and evaluating certain practices in these fields from a moral point of view and having students clarify their own values in terms of their various societal roles. Particular attention will be paid to issues in bioethics and family ethics as well as applying an ethical decision-making model to relevant case studies.

345-CXC-HR       2-1-3      2 cr.
Values in the Workplace: Hotel Management and Tourism
This course aims to apply different ethical theories, principles and values to the areas of work and business in the hotel, restaurant and tourism fields. Values and virtues like cooperation and fairness are discussed along with the application of an ethical decision-making model to relevant case studies.

345-A01-HR      2-1-3      2 cr.
Ethics and Human Rights

(for Liberal Arts students)
This course explores the philosophical and historical foundations of the concept of human rights. It examines the seminal philosophical literature on the subject and the history of the most important codes and charters of rights.

Humanities – program specific
“The third set, which is part of the general education component specific to each program, is aimed at deepening and reinforcing the critical thinking skills developed in the first two sets. It is, therefore, sequenced so that students can build on the critical skills, knowledge and insights developed in the first two sets. By situating these issues in their appropriate worldview and knowledge contexts, students develop a critical and autonomous approach to ethical values in general and to the values involved in their own fields of interest in particular. This final set also provides students with an opportunity to consolidate personal and social values.” – MEES, General Education (2009)

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