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English  

Quebec collegial curriculum requires each student to take four English courses in order to obtain the Diploma of Collegial Studies. Students normally take one required English course per semester.

English Exit Exam

In order to receive their diplomas, graduating students must have passed the English Exit Exam, which evaluates college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking.

To be eligible to write the English Exit Exam, students must have passed two of the following English courses AND be in the process of completing a third: 603-101-MQ, 603-102-MQ or 603-103-MQ.

           

603-001-50/603-003-50       2-2-4       2 2/3 cr.
Preparatory College English
This course is directed toward improving fundamental English language skills, both oral and written. It is for those students who need additional practice and review before entering the core English courses. The 603-001-50 course is designed for students who did not finish their high school studies in Québec whereas the 603-003-50 course is for students who have graduated with a Québec high school diploma.
This particular English course is not credited towards the diploma. Students will be streamed into the course based on the College’s criteria involving final marks from Secondary V English as well as a placement test. Students must pass the course in order to advance to the core English courses.

This particular English course is not credited towards the diploma.

Introduction to College English: Components of Discourse
English 101

603-101-MQ      2-2-4       2 2/3 cr.
Literature and Composition
This course is directed toward improving English language skills by extensive written work based on literary texts. It uses the same textbooks as the Introduction to College English: Literature, but because of the emphasis on writing skills has a reduced list of readings.

603-111-HR      2-2-4       2 2/3 cr.
Literature
This course is directed toward broadening the student's awareness and understanding of literature while improving writing abilities by extensive written work based on literary texts.

Note: This course is also offered to Liberal Arts students as 603-112-HR.

Literary Genres:
English 102

(Prerequisite: English 101)

603-222-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Canadian Classics
This course is a concentrated survey of Canadian literature from the Colonial period to the present. It introduces students to the most important authors through the study of literary genres as they evolve historically in accordance with the development of Canadian literary culture.

603-223-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
English Classics I
Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 17th century, this course enables students to: distinguish genres of literary discourse, recognize literary conventions within a specific genre, situate a discourse within its historical and literary period and explicate a discourse representative of a literary genre.

603-224-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Major Authors in English
This course intensively examines a variety of works in specific genres by a minimum of three and a maximum of six authors, drawn from more than one century. This course enables students to: distinguish genres of literary discourse, recognize literary conventions within a specific genre and explicate a discourse representative of a literary genre.

603-225-HR       2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Eastern Literature

Examining a variety of works in specific genres drawn from more than one century, this course explores the traditions of Eastern literature, its techniques and conventions.   Students will discover the unique features evident in Eastern poetry, fiction, and drama, such as Japan’s Kabuki theatre, China’s poetic principle of Shi, as well as the literary approaches of India and Vietnam.

603-227-HR       2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
English Quebec Writers

This course will explore the rich and culturally important contributions of English writers in Quebec, some of whom have achieved iconic status in Canada and abroad. Through contextualizing and analyzing the diverse genres in which such writers have distinguished themselves (including travel narratives, newspapers, fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and literary criticism), students will come to appreciate the power and presence of English writers in Quebec—from the early days of colonialism and settlement to the present. Far from being outsiders, Quebec’s English writers have carved out unique perspectives with regard to religion, language, politics, place, and the immigrant experience that have helped to shape and define this complex province.

603-228-HR       2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
The Graphic Novel

This course will consider the storytelling potential of graphic novels, an often neglected form of artistic and narrative expression with a long and rich history. Boldly combining images and text, graphic novels of recent years have explored divisive issues often considered the domain of “serious” literature: immigration, racism, war and terrorism, dysfunctional families, and much more. Informed by techniques of both traditional literary theory and visual cultural studies, we will explore a range of graphic novels. In particular, we will be attentive to the unique power of the medium, exploring graphic novels that challenge the conventions of genre, narrative, and high and low culture.

603-230-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Women Writers

This course studies significant literature by women in English from the Middle Ages to the present. It introduces students to the most important women authors through the study of literary genres as they evolve historically in Britain and North America.

603-231-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
First Peoples: Literature and Culture

This course exposes students to multiple examples of First Peoples literature and culture as a way in to the history and continual development of these communities across the country. Using a variety of texts and media (which might include short stories, novels, graphic novels, contemporary First Peoples music, and recorded lectures), this course will explore literature produced by First Peoples from early eras to the present.

603-232-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Modern Drama

Using a variety of media, this course will examine the development of modern drama from the late 19th century to the present day. Students will be introduced to well-known playwrights and significant plays, and will explore the language of drama as well as the historical and cultural contexts of each work.

Literary Themes:
English 103

(Prerequisite: English 101)

603-321-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
American Classics
This course examines certain themes that are basic to American literature and essential to American culture. It enables students to: recognize the treatment of a theme within a literary discourse, situate a discourse within its cultural context and explicate a discourse from a thematic perspective.

603-322-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3cr.
English Classics II
Consisting of a chronological survey of English classics from the 18th century to the present, this course enables students to: recognize the treatment of a theme within a literary discourse, situate a literary discourse within its cultural context and explicate a discourse from a thematic perspective.

603-324-HR      2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Major Authors in Translation
The purpose of this course is to explore one or more themes as they appear in the translated works of three or more major authors who wrote or write in languages other than English. To ensure a wide scope, the works studied represent more than one genre, more than one language and have been written in more than one century.

603-325-HR       2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Shakespeare Then and Now
This course focuses on the major themes conveyed in representative histories, comedies and tragedies. Through the examination of relevant historical data, students will acquire an understanding of the links between the Elizabethan world and the world depicted in Shakespeare's plays. By comparing original texts with contemporary cinematic adaptations, students will gain a fuller appreciation for the endurance and universality of Shakespeare's themes. Students will further identify the principal factors that have contributed to the prominent position of Shakespeare's major works within the English literary tradition.

603-326-HR        2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Post-Colonial Literature

This course takes at its theme the integral, yet contentious relationship between literature and history.  Using poetry, drama, and fiction to examine the blurry border between fiction and fact, as well as introducing students to the basics of historiography, this class will explore the ethics of and efforts at representing the past in the literature of colonial and post-colonial countries.

603-327-HR        2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
The Bible as Literature

This course provides students with a basic understanding of some of the foundational figures, traditions, and stories of the three Mosaic faiths. Studying the biblical texts will enable students to recognize allusions to scripture in simple references, images and symbols, themes and motifs, and the underlying myths inspiring new interpretations of biblical legends. This is not a course in hermeneutics; students will focus on the Bible as literature. Readings may include selections from the Torah, Prophets, and Writings of the Jewish Bible, as well as the Gospels and Epistles of Christian scripture.

603-328-HR         2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Fiction in Adaptation

Certain stories and characters have endured the test of time because their central themes have such powerful cultural resonance. However, over time these foundation narratives have been adapted to speak to different socio-cultural contexts. This course studies foundation narratives and their adaptations across different historical periods as well as across different forms (for example, prose, theatre, cinema, poetry, and dance). Students will discuss the controversy of adaptation, including the adaptation of high culture works to low, or pop, culture, and vice versa, as well as the debate about adaptation as a creative process. Most importantly, students will explore how adaptations alter an original text to address its themes in new and productive ways.

603-329-HR         2-2-3       2 1/3 cr.
Children and Literature

Beginning with folk and fairy tales intended for adults and later adapted for children, as well as traditional songs and poems that were later published, the course will study themes that are central to children's literature. The course will explore influential children's literature from a variety of historical periods, including contemporary works. In so doing, students will trace the evolution of themes expressed in these stories. Students will also analyze the teaching of ideas and lessons (behavioural, moral, social, cultural, practical) transmitted in children's fiction. Other areas of study may include recurring issues in children's literature, stylistic features of this genre, the absence of adults, and the representation of authority in literature both for and about children.

Block "B"
Program-Related English

(Prerequisite: English 101)

603-CXB-HR      2-2-2       2 cr.
Social Milieu
In common with the other Block “B” English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, practical and professional writing, reading and writing across the curriculum while exposing the students to a variety of literary forms. This course deals with issues relevant in the study of Social Sciences/Commerce, though the focus remains solidly on literature.

603-CXC-HR      2-2-2       2 cr.
Caring Milieu
This English course is designed for students in Nursing and Early Childhood Education, in other words for students who care for others. Since communication is essential in the caring milieu, the course emphasizes clear, precise, and concise written and oral communication. Through fiction and non-fiction, students examine both the message and the medium in terms of their programs.

603-CXD-HR      2-2-2       2 cr.
Professional Milieu
In common with the other Block "B" English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, practical and professional writing, reading and writing across the curriculum while exposing the students to a variety of literary forms. Although the course devotes considerable attention to practical and professional writing, the focus remains solidly on literature.

603-CXE-HR      2-2-2       2 cr.
Arts and Science Milieu
This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Science or Arts. The literature content of the course focuses on subjects pertaining to these two fields, including: the portrayals of scientists and artists, the search for truth, the roles of the artist and the scientist, and the concerns of science fiction. The course also introduces students to the basic assumptions and theories of literary criticism (new criticism, reader-response, deconstructive, biographical, historical, new historical, psychological, feminist). Students learn to apply theory in the analysis of texts and in their own writing. Each student also gives an oral presentation on a piece of expository prose that deals with issues pertaining to science and/or arts.

603-CXG-HR        2-2-2      2 cr.
English: Tourism and Hospitality Milieu
This course is designed for students pursuing studies in Tourism and Hotel Management.  In common with the other Block “B” English courses, this one provides training in public speaking, effective communication, reading and writing across the curriculum, while exposing students to a variety of literary forms.  Through the study of literature, students will examine themes that are relevant to the tourism and hospitality industries.

* * * * * * *

The following courses are offered in the Liberal Arts program:

603-H01-HR      3-0-3       2 cr.
Epic Poetry
This course introduces Liberal Arts students to the most significant Greek and Roman classical texts, including works by Homer, Virgil and Ovid. The major themes and conventions of these works are examined in light of their significance in shaping western culture and thought.

603-H02-HR      3-0-3       2 cr.
Creating Prose
This course analyzes significant works in fiction and focuses on the creative process and techniques that contribute to the art of fiction. Through a variety of exercises and workshops, students as well participate in the composition of fiction.

603-H03-HR      3-0-3       2 cr.
Creating Poetry
Through the study and analysis of a variety of poems, Liberal Arts students gain an appreciation of a number of techniques integral to the creation of poetry. Selective exercises and workshops enable students to participate in the composition of poetry.

603-H04-HR      3-0-3       2 cr.
Drama
This course exposes Liberal Arts students to a wide range of drama, both traditional and modern. Students as well participate in workshops and other activities designed to lead to an appreciation of the dramatist's and the actor's craft.

603-H05-HR      2-1-2      1 2/3 cr.
Business Writing
This course develops the skills required to plan, write, and edit typical business documents.  In addition, students will practice formatting, summarizing, and proofreading.

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